Brighton Advice Centre

BHT’s Brighton Advice Centre provides specialist advice on housing, benefits and immigration related issues. 

brighton

Brighton Advice Centre

BHT’s Addiction services projects work across Brighton & Hove across the addiction pathway and consist of three services.

Brighton and Hove Advice Centre provides specialist advice on a range of housing, immigration and welfare benefits related issues.

Appointments can be by email, telephone or through attending a drop-in session.

Address: 144 London Rd, Brighton BN1 4PH

Telephone: 01273 645400

Email: [email protected]

Drop-in session: Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday morning from 9.15am

Our Services in Brighton

Specialist Housing Advice

BHT Brighton specialist housing advice team are able to provide free and confidential advice to people on possession action, homelessness, suitability of accommodation, tenancy rights, disrepair and allocations policies

Read More

Immigration Legal Service

The Immigration Legal Service (ILS) provides advice and representation, under the Legal Aid scheme, in all areas of asylum and human rights law relating to Article 3 of the ECHR.

Read More

Court Duty Scheme

The Court Duty Scheme provides last-minute emergency advice for people facing eviction who have a court hearing.

Read More

Moneyworks

Moneyworks is here to help Brighton & Hove residents save money, make money and manage their money better. The services are for anyone who is struggling to make ends meet.

Read More

 

BHT Advice Centre

Address: 144 London Rd, Brighton BN1 4PH

Telephone: 01273 645400

Email: [email protected]

BHT Case Studies

Baddar

For some it comes as a surprise that BHT runs an immigration and asylum legal service. The overwhelming majority of those we work with are ‘unaccompanied minors’, young people and children arriving in the UK with no adults to look after their welfare.

Baddar came to the UK in 2008 aged 15 fleeing persecution in Afghanistan. His initial asylum claim was refused. We assisted him with a further application to allow him to remain in the UK but this was also refused. After this, there have been numerous appeals with every decision seeming to go against him. We gathered evidence in support of his claim to show that he is particularly vulnerable as he has a learning difficulty and suffers from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and depression.

We gathered country evidence to support the fact that he would be at risk if he returned to Afghanistan.

Mike

Last year our advice services in Brighton, Eastbourne and Hastings prevented 817 households from becoming homeless. The impact of this is huge: fewer people on the streets, less demands on local council homelessness services, or moving children away from the schools and their friends. Some people become homeless, not through any fault of their own.

Mike moved into a Housing Association flat in 1980. A few months later he was offered a job as a caretaker at a nearby social club – a job he did for 36 years until he was made redundant. In 1996 he had moved to another flat owned by the housing association, but unbeknown to him, his employers had taken a sub-lease on the flat. In law, his employer had become his landlord. The social club went into liquidation.

Not only did he lose his job, but he wasn’t given any redundancy pay and he was told to leave his home of 20 years.

shares